Our Building

The  St George’s Hall at 14 Elm Street is a Toronto landmark — a building with a lively history of remarkable colour and vivacity in a convenient downtown location. It has been designated a building of National Historic Significance by the Government of Canada.

The focus of Club life and activity is the Great Hall, a splendid room with a cathedral ceiling, a large fireplace, a choir gallery, a well-equipped stage, a Steinway grand piano, and wonderfully tongue-in-cheek banners by J.E.H. MacDonald celebrating the names of illustrious early Members, such as the one of the founding “Member # 1”, Augustus Bridle, shown here.

The Great Hall holds rotating exhibitions of paintings, drawings and photography; the Hall also serves as an intimate concert hall and theatre. Its principal function, however, is as a dining room, where members and their guests dine and socialize around refectory tables.

Adjoining the Great Hall is a well-stocked bar and a comfortable lounge. The LAMPS room across the hall is used for lunches and meetings. The Club entrance hall, downstairs cloakroom area and upstairs hallways, as well as all the various meeting rooms, are treasure-troves of Club memorabilia. The visual artists lay claim to the third floor Studio for painting sessions several times a week.

The building was built by the St. George’s Society in 1891. The Arts and Letters Club leased it 1920 and purchased it in 1986. The three-storey building has been extensively renovated and is wheelchair-accessible.

The  St George’s Hall at 14 Elm Street is a Toronto landmark — a building with a lively history of remarkable colour and vivacity in a convenient downtown location. It has been designated a building of National Historic Significance by the Government of Canada.

The focus of Club life and activity is the Great Hall, a splendid room with a cathedral ceiling, a large fireplace, a choir gallery, a well-equipped stage, a Steinway grand piano, and wonderfully tongue-in-cheek banners by J.E.H. MacDonald celebrating the names of illustrious early Members, such as the one of the founding “Member # 1”, Augustus Bridle, shown here.

 

The Great Hall holds rotating exhibitions of paintings, drawings and photography; the Hall also serves as an intimate concert hall and theatre. Its principal function, however, is as a dining room, where members and their guests dine and socialize around refectory tables.

Adjoining the Great Hall is a well-stocked bar and a comfortable lounge. The LAMPS room across the hall is used for lunches and meetings. The Club entrance hall, downstairs cloakroom area and upstairs hallways, as well as all the various meeting rooms, are treasure-troves of Club memorabilia. The visual artists lay claim to the third floor Studio for painting sessions several times a week.

The building was built by the St. George’s Society in 1891. The Arts and Letters Club leased it 1920 and purchased it in 1986. The three-storey building has been extensively renovated and is wheelchair-accessible.

 

Where Are We?

We are close to theatres, shopping, and the business centre of Toronto. St George’s Hall is two short blocks from the Yonge and Dundas subway stop, and there is discounted Members’ parking nearby.

St George's Hall

The painting of Philippa Faulkner hangs in our Boardroom. It is by member, Bill Sherman, and as it predates her membership, she and her painting had a presence in the Club before women were admitted in 1985. She joined us in 1989 and remained a member until her death 12 years later.

This is a drawing by Arthur Lismer of member Peter Haworth, in the persona of the Marquesa Casati (1881-1957). She was the most scandalous woman of her day and a favourite subject of prominent painters and photographers. This drawing probably records a club event occasioned by the 1934 purchase by the Art Gallery of Toronto (now AGO) of Augustus John's portrait of Casati.

This is a drawing by Arthur Lismer of member Peter Haworth, in the persona of the Marquesa Casati (1881-1957). She was the most scandalous woman of her day and a favourite subject of prominent painters and photographers. This drawing probably records a club event occasioned by the 1934 purchase by the Art Gallery of Toronto (now AGO) of Augustus John's portrait of Casati.

Sculptor Janet Hunter and one of her works in her solo exhibition at the Club

Visual artist Andrew Sookrah with his portrait of singer and opera director Penelope Tibbles Cookson

Author and poet Molly Peacock with some of her books
Photo: Candice Ferreira

 

Jazz cellist George Crotty in a solo performance at the Club

 

Author and poet Molly Peacock with some of her books.
Photo: Candice Ferreira

How to Reach Us

The Arts and Letters Club of Toronto
14 Elm Street
Toronto, Ontario
Canada, M5G 1G7
416 597-0223

General Inquiries: E-mail links

Club Manager: Fiona McKeown
and for inquiries about renting facilities for weddings, or for social or business occasions.

Membership enquiries: Naomi Hunter
Administrative Assistant: Cornelia Persich
Archivist: Scott James